Pediatric Services Pediatric Services: An intervention team serving children with developmental delays.

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Pediatric Services

Water Therapy Program

April 14 through June 10, 1999
12:001:00 Wednesdays

"Movement is basic to learning" is the underlying assumption, with emphasis on the child’s ability to participate. Consequently, the learning areas and movement levels follow the normal developmental sequence, with a therapeutic base.

Motor components, incorporating normalizing muscle tone, head and trunk control, and equilibrium reactions are to be taught. Children needing neuromuscular therapy benefit particularly from the warmth of the water and from the development of head and trunk righting and rotation with flexion. Vertical, prone, and supine positions are designed to inhibit retained reflexes and promote grading movements from one position to another, with central control. Midline and symmetry are emphasized for postural stability.

The child with a sensory integration deficit can also benefit from water therapy. Tactile experiences inherent in water are more complicated and numerous that may be thought, including splashing, temperature, sound, toweling, and touch. In water, learned anti-gravity responses are not effective, and new responses must develop. New movement patterns can be promoted based on the sensory feedback to the central nervous system. Gravitationally and vestibularly insecure children can benefit from planned and controlled sensory input to enhance the overall organization of the brain.

Developmental milestones of movement are undertaken typically in the bathtub or wading pool, such as pushing up on the arms, weight bearing in the crawling position, kneeling, sitting, and standing. These will be taught as the child is ready and able.

Voluntary breath control promotes lung capacity and improved oral motor abilities.

Lastly, beginning swimming incorporates therapeutic movements at a cognitive level and can lead to recreational swimming. Movement education in the water stresses quality in movement, with appropriate quantity applied according to age, ability and motivation. Combined with structure and spontaneous play, anyone can learn to feel comfortable and safe in the water.

The cost $6 and the pool is 89.

 
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HomeParents' CornerParents' Corner ArchiveProfessional CornerProfessional Corner ArchiveCase in ProgressCase in Progress ArchiveInspirational MessagesInspirational Messages ArchiveDirect ServicesConsultingSeminars, Workshops, and MoreSpecial EventsRecommended ReadingRecommended Reading for ChildrenAsk the Experts News FlashCurrent Question and AnswerUnderstanding the LingoAbout the TeamTestimonialsFees, Location, and DetailsTypical Development: MakennaTypical Development: LaceyResourcesPrivacyStatementConfidentiality

CONTENTS (except as noted) ©2003-8 by Pediatric Services

Corporate Office in Morro Bay, California (San Luis Obispo County)
Telephone: 805.772-6014 Fax: 805.772.8246

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Worthington, Ohio 43085

Articles written by Pediatric Services staff are copyright by Pediatric Services.
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Information provided is for educational use only
and is not intended to replace medical advice from your physician.

Last modified: January 26, 2013