Pediatric Services Pediatric Services: An intervention team serving children with developmental delays.

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Early Childhood Education

ds-early.jpg (3083 bytes) Elizabeth, early childhood education specialist, works with Elias on putting blocks on top of each other and into a container.

Pediatric Services is committed to empowering children and their families to achieve maximum independence. Collaboration between educators and the family are the tools to achieve this goal. Through intervention and education, children can achieve their highest potential in all developmental areas.

The child-education specialist develops a program that is tailored to your family’s unique situation and schedule. Your family values, relationships, language, and ethnic background are a respected priorities for us.

Working with the Pediatric Services education specialist, you have access to many developmental resources. After the developmental evaluation, we work with you to establish an individualized plan will to address targeted areas of need — large or small motor movements, language acquisition, cognition, social and self care skills, and visual perceptual.

As parents, you are your child’s first and best teacher. We demonstrate age-appropriate activities in each area targeted that you can do with your child to promote development.

Large muscles and gross motor skills

Here we address physical development and activities include those with your child on her tummy, back, and side. We work on the skills needed to get into and out of a sitting position as well as various ways to sit. Other skills taught include pulling to stand, standing, squatting, cruising, and walking. These activities promote balance and protective extension reactions.

Small muscles and fine motor skills

These are typically hand and arm skills — grasping objects and reaching with one hand or two. Pre-writing skills are included here, as are activities such as pointing, stringing beads, and manipulating of small items.

Language development

Children must develop communications skills to expresses their wants and to understand others. Pediatric Services uses situations throughout the day to focus on communication and language skills. We will help you discover ways of using daily routines promote the use of language and the opportunity to practice communication attempts.

Social use of communication is stressed because of its importance in the development of language. Turn taking, reciprocal leadership, and seeking information from others demonstrates comprehension of the use of language. Modeling responses that stimulate language and communication, recognition of signals and cues from the child, behavior regulation, and successful activity transitions are taught.

Language and communication lead to social competence. We use modeling and teaching of social games that are appropriate for your child’s age, including interactive play. Mirror play, social play, and pretend play (such as pretending to be on the telephone, dress up, and driving a car) are all important early social skills. Demonstration of a variety of uses for a single toy links social play with cognitive development.

Cognitive skills

These skills allow your child to understand the "how" and "why" of objects. Cognition is closely linked with language and fine motor skills in the young child. We explore the similarities and differences between objects in the child’s world — wheels, plates, and blocks, are all round, for example.

These efforts also expose the child to the novelty of items — how puzzle pieces fit to make a whole picture, how colors or shapes may be related, matching sizes, and sorting items by various criteria.

Visual perception

Vision is interwoven into most areas of development. The ability to perceive, follow a moving object or person, and imitate fine and gross motor activities are directly affected by the ability to see.

We teach simple, easy techniques to promote visual acuity including ways to maximize contrast, emphasize light, and make judgements based on distance and space.

Educators recommend activities individually or in a group. We teach specific activities to promote you child’s development. Working in a team with you, the parent, we are able to enhance your knowledge to support your child’s growth and developmental milestones.

 
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HomeParents' CornerParents' Corner ArchiveProfessional CornerProfessional Corner ArchiveCase in ProgressCase in Progress ArchiveInspirational MessagesInspirational Messages ArchiveDirect ServicesConsultingSeminars, Workshops, and MoreSpecial EventsRecommended ReadingRecommended Reading for ChildrenAsk the Experts News FlashCurrent Question and AnswerUnderstanding the LingoAbout the TeamTestimonialsFees, Location, and DetailsTypical Development: MakennaTypical Development: LaceyResourcesPrivacyStatementConfidentiality

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Corporate Office in Morro Bay, California (San Luis Obispo County)
Telephone: 805.550.8799 Fax: 805.772.8246

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Articles written by Pediatric Services staff are copyright by Pediatric Services.
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Information provided is for educational use only
and is not intended to replace medical advice from your physician.

Last modified: January 26, 2013